Controversies in Cardiology: Blood Pressure Targets in Hypertension

Controversies in Cardiology: Blood Pressure Targets in Hypertension

Results recently published in The New England Journal of Medicine drew renewed attention to the SPRINT study (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial), led by co-principal investigator Jackson T. Wright Jr., MD, PhD. In the article, lead author Dr. Wright, Director, Clinical Hypertension Program, UH Case Medical Center, shared groundbreaking findings in those participants randomized to a systolic blood pressure target of 120 compared to 140 mm Hg. Major adverse cardiovascular events were reduced by 25 percent and all-cause mortality by 27 percent. The SPRINT study’s outcomes have sparked discussion about the merits of treating patients with hypertension to much lower targets than previously recommended.

Presenters

Daniel I. Simon, MD
President, UH Case Medical Center
President, UH Harrington Heart & Vascular Institute
Herman K. Hellerstein Chair in Cardiovascular Research, UH Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Professor of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine 

Jackson T. Wright, Jr., MD, PhD
Director, Clinical Hypertension Program, and Director, Dahms Clinical Research Unit, UH Case Medical Center
Professor of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

 

Controversies in Cardiology
Controversies in Cardiology is a Q&A series featuring physicians with University Hospitals Harrington Heart & Vascular Institute. This series of discussions takes a closer look at some of the current hot topics in cardiovascular medicine and surgery, including clinical trials, new guidelines and the latest research findings and discoveries. Our experts examine the potential benefits and risks of these new innovations, and explore how they might impact patient care.

Video recorded at University Hospitals, Cleveland, Ohio, November 2015.


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University Hospitals